#detailsdeHonduras part 2

Ongoing photojournalism project. See Part 1.

(Kristen Bruce Photography and Multimedia)

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|| Shelter || Homelessness, family displacement and child abandonment are all problems that the country of Honduras has to face. Unfortuantely this puts many young people and children in a very vulnerable situation. But I want to take the opportunity to highlight two incredible ministries who are working toward providing shelter and a family atmosphere for kids at risk. The dear children’s home, Hope House – Hogar Esperanza, where I lived a short time, currently houses about 20 kids and is in the process of expanding to be able to provide a family atmosphere to many more. To help with this project see their facebook page. Identity Mission is a great ministry that is (as their facebook page says) …embracing the full spectrum of orphan care in implementing a foster care system throughout Honduras, preserving families, and reaching kids in orphanages. Amid desperation and difficulties, God is doing great things in Honduras!

People - Regional Emigration Since the early twentieth century, Honduras has had the challenge of absorbing thousands of immigrants from neighboring countries. Political tensions throughout Central America have been a key factor behind much of the immigration. The number of immigrants from El Salvador looking for land or jobs was especially high between the early twentieth century and the onset of the 1969 Soccer War between El Salvador and Honduras. A significant number of Salvadoran immigrants worked in the banana plantations during the 1930s and 1940s. Armed conflict in Nicaragua, Guatemala, and El Salvador in the 1980s resulted in the arrival of more than 60,000 refugees. Most of these refugees live near their respective borders, and the majority are women and children. Throughout the 1980s, Nicaraguan refugees continued to arrive in Honduras as the war between Nicaragua's Sandinista government and the Nicaraguan Resistance forces (known as the Contras, short for contrarevolucionarios-- counterrevolutionaries in Spanish) intensified. By the early 1990s, Honduras hosted an estimated 250,000 refugees or immigrants from Central America. http://countrystudies.us/honduras/43.htm

|| People – Regional Emigration ||
Since the early twentieth century, Honduras has had the challenge of absorbing thousands of immigrants from neighboring countries. Political tensions throughout Central America have been a key factor behind much of the immigration. The number of immigrants from El Salvador looking for land or jobs was especially high between the early twentieth century and the onset of the 1969 Soccer War between El Salvador and Honduras. A significant number of Salvadoran immigrants worked in the banana plantations during the 1930s and 1940s.
Armed conflict in Nicaragua, Guatemala, and El Salvador in the 1980s resulted in the arrival of more than 60,000 refugees. Most of these refugees live near their respective borders, and the majority are women and children. Throughout the 1980s, Nicaraguan refugees continued to arrive in Honduras as the war between Nicaragua’s Sandinista government and the Nicaraguan Resistance forces (known as the Contras, short for contrarevolucionarios– counterrevolutionaries in Spanish) intensified. By the early 1990s, Honduras hosted an estimated 250,000 refugees or immigrants from Central America.
http://countrystudies.us/honduras/43.htm

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Sometimes I just get a cool shot of something that creeps me out… 😉

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|| People – Child labor || It is reported that over 150,000 children in Honduras are involved in child labor. The most common work among children is agriculture but many are sent to beg in the streets and in the worst cases solicited for the sex trade or to work as hit men or extortionists for gangs. Some children combine work and school but often the economic situation of their family is so severe that they are expected to work full time leaving no time for education. Recent data indicate that 60 percent of working children work in agriculture. Children are sometimes trafficked from rural areas into commercial sexual exploitation in urban and tourist destinations such as the Bay Islands, La Ceiba, San Pedro Sula, and Tegucigalpa. In addition, reports indicate that Honduran children are trafficked to Central and North America for commercial sexual exploitation. In 2013, Honduras made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The Government of Honduras passed a Legislative Decree harmonizing legal protections for children and trained labor inspectors on child labor issues. Most of the inspections take place in the urban areas of San Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa, and the ILO Committee of Experts reported that resource constraints limited labor inspections in rural areas and in indigenous communities, where hazardous activities in agriculture and fishing or diving are concentrated. http://www.dol.gov/ilab/reports/child-labor/honduras.htm

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One thought on “#detailsdeHonduras part 2

  1. Pingback: #detailsdeHonduras Part 3 | Add to the Beauty

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